Architectur

Italian masters created a unique Renaissance work of art, Schloss Porcia. The magnificent building has parallels to the Belvedere Palace in Prague, Trento Castle and the Khevenhüller Stadtpalais (today's town hall).

 

The three-story structure with its four wings enclosing the charming arcade courtyard can be described as an Italian "palazzo" in its type. The choice of the free location, however, which deliberately does not allow inclusion in a row of houses, is again a characteristic feature of a "castle". In contrast, the monumental towers on the northwest and southeastern front inevitably point to the necessary defensiveness and are thus an important element of the architectural repertoire of the typical medieval "castle". The Renaissance Palace Porcia thus represents a successful combination of castle - palace - Palazzo.

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Before entering the Arkadenhof, the coat of arms made by Kilian Pittner in 1703 with the lilies of the Porcia and figurative jewelry recalls the great age of this princely family. The arcades of the courtyard, resting symmetrically on round pillars, have the same distance on all three floors, giving the impression of almost "Gothic" weighting. While on the ground floor Tuscan capitals or capitals with volutes on the sides seem to carry the building alone, compositional capitals decorate the three upper floors of the prestigious Renaissance courtyard. The south side of the courtyard is dominated by the coat of arms of Porcia, six golden lilies on a blue field, by Baltasar Klenkh (before 1707). Right next to the south portal, the "Rizzi memorial tablet" of the Grillparzer Association recalls the great importance of the writer, critic and journalist Vinzenz von Rizzi (1816-1856), born here in Spittal in Porcia Castle. Basement and ground floor were and still are used as storage and economic areas, the representation rooms are located on the second floor.

Although much was destroyed in the great fire of Spittal (1797), many sights can still be visited today. The past comes to life in the tower room, in the coffered ceiling of the Millstatt Abbey, the Renaissance chimney from Italy, the coat of arms hall, the Ancestral Hall and much more. The second floor houses the Museum of Popular Culture and the Salamanca cellar houses the Porcia Gallery.

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